Tag Archives: book review

I’ve managed to get a decent amount of reading done this month, and write more on this blog which I’m very pleasantly surprised about. I will hopefully keep this up in August, so let me know if there’s anything you would like to see me discuss, whether it’s books/tv/history.

Monthly Reading Roundup

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The Genius of Emily Brontë

It makes me sad to realise I haven’t written anything about Emily Brontë yet, so far she has only been a passing mention in my posts about the Brontë family, so I wanted to express my love and appreciation for her writing in this post.
Emily is seen to be tough, quiet, stubborn, a genius who was ripped from the world before she had reached the heights of her literary powers. We know little about her or her thoughts on the events in her life, knowing she was continually immersed in her imaginary world of Gondal that inspired her writing, Wuthering Heights being her only novel despite speculation that she had started a second work before she died that was destroyed.  Even though we only have her masterpiece Wuthering Heights and her poems left, she has left an incredibly significant mark on English literature. Continue reading

Monthly Reading Roundup: May

Monthly Reading Roundup: May

Didn’t get to read quite as much this month, but with my exams and other assignments it’s been a stressful time. Thankfully I’ve finished my second year of university, so this summer I’m looking forward to actually having the time to read for fun, as well as starting reading for my dissertation on Anne Bronte. Continue reading

Monthly Reading Roundup: April

 

A History of Britain in 21 Women by Jenni Murray Rating: 4/5

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Reading Non-Fiction, especially History books for me, always seems more daunting than it actually is.  After neglecting my growing pile of history books, I decided to start with A History of Britain in 21 Women by Jenni Murray. I couldn’t have asked for a better book to get me back into non-fiction, with Jenni Murray perfectly merging the general overview of these women’s lives with her personal experiences.  This helped make the book engaging and enjoyable, rather than it reading like a Wikipedia page or just dull retelling of facts like some history books. Continue reading

The Bold and Brilliant Anne Bronte

“I am satisfied that if a book is a good one, it is so whatever the sex of the author may be. All novels are or should be written for both men and women to read, and I am at a loss to conceive how a man should permit himself to write anything that would be really disgraceful to a woman, or why a woman should be censured for writing anything that would be proper and becoming for a man”- Anne Bronte, Second preface to ‘The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

 

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It was only until I studied ‘Wuthering Heights’ at A-Level that I realised there even was a third Bronte sister. Even so, she received a passing mention, and it wasn’t until the summer before I started university that I investigated her novels. I watched the Tenant of Wildfell Hall and was incredibly surprised that this incredible story had never gained my attention beforehand. Continue reading